D – Transregional connections and entangled regions

Globalizing Eastern Europe: New perspectives on transregional entanglements of an often neglected region

Event Details

  • Date

    Thursday, 25 June - 13:00 – 15:00

    Thursday, 25 June - 15:30 – 17:30

  • Venue
    tba
  • Theme
    D – Transregional connections and entangled regions
Convenor
  • Lena Dallywater (Leibniz Institute for Regional Geography)
Chair
  • Mikhail Lipkin (Institute of World History of the Russian Academy of Sciences)
  • Ernst van der Wal (Stellenbosch University)
Commentator
  • Matthias Middell (Leipzig University)
Panelists
  • Anna Calori (Leipzig University, Centre for Area Studies)
  • Bence Kocsev (Leipzig University, SFB 1199)
  • Barbora Buzássyová (Slovak Academy of Sciences, Institute of History)
  • Katja Naumann (Wissenschafts Campus EEGA)
  • Cristian Cercel (Ruhr University Bochum, Institute for Social Movements)
  • Claudia Eggart (University of Manchester)
  • Gilad Ben-Nun (Leipzig University)
  • Lubina Mahling (Sorbisches Institut Bautzen)

Papers

  • Anna Calori
    Losing the global? Corporate cultures, contested development and de-globalisation in a (post)Yugoslav enterprise

    Losing the global? Corporate cultures, contested development and de-globalisation in a (post)Yugoslav enterprise

    This paper will chart the rise and fall of Yugoslavia’s “globalist economic dream” through the case of a large enterprise in Yugoslavia’s semi-periphery, embedded in economic exchanges with the Global South. After a “leap outwards” as a protagonist of development projects in partnering non-aligned countries, this company became centre of two clashing visions of economic reconstruction in the post-war context. Should the country rely on its previous socialist-global giants, or should it turn to Small and Medium Enterprises for development? This debate reveals a complex and long-term discussion about the prospects of post-socialist semi-peripheries in the global economy, about notions, visions, and expectations of “globality”, and about the legacies of socialist globalization after the collapse of state socialism.
  • Bence Kocsev
    Fluctuations in East-South Relations During and Beyond the Cold War

    Fluctuations in East-South Relations During and Beyond the Cold War

    Seizing on the opportunities triggered by the Khrushchev „thaw”, a great variety of economic, political, cultural and academic relations had been developed between the Eastern European socialist countries and the newly independent countries (and liberation movements) of Africa, Asia and Latin America. Given the exponentially expanding and intensive East-South contacts during the 1960s and 1970s, research on the global influence of socialism even argues that alternative practices and projects of globalization existed within the framework of these relations. Though the initially vigorous expansion of these relations created many illusions about the effectiveness of these connections, once the advantageous international climate had turned less favorable in the 1980s, the attitude of the parties’ vis-à-vis each other had significantly changed. Consequently, whereas the communist period represented an era of an active engagement with “Third World” countries, towards the end of the Cold War these contacts (and the resultant alternative projects of globalization) started quickly to decline. Quite recently, however, these connections and identifications came again to the fore and the political, economic (and to a certain extent cultural) legacies of the previous East-South encounters have been going through a sort of revival in the last couple of years (see e.g. the so-called “Eastern opening” in Hungary). Applying a rather macro perspective, the main question of the proposed paper is then how the shifts in the political-economic integration of East-Central-Europe impacted these East-South relations and more importantly, how to interpret them in the context of histories of globalization. The paper will especially focus on the stakeholders establishing, shaping, and advancing these relations. Though the primary focus will be on Hungary, the paper will frequently gaze out on other Eastern European countries undergoing the same processes.
  • Barbora Buzássyová
    Globalising development aid strategies: Czechoslovak participation in UNESCO (1960s-1980s)

    Globalising development aid strategies: Czechoslovak participation in UNESCO (1960s-1980s)

    The paper will explore the shifting patterns of Czechoslovak educational aid strategies to “Third World” within the broader framework of global debates on the nature of development aid promoted by UNESCO during the first and second development decades. Adopting the understanding of Czechoslovak experts in UNESCO's structures as “the agents of internationalization” I argue that they mediated the Czechoslovak educational aid designs to global community to same extent as they translated the international policies into local milieus. The presentation will thus try to discuss whether the changing rhetoric of Czechoslovak aid programmes could be read as a subtle process towards “Europeanization” of Czechoslovak foreign policy or rather as a “life-saving” tactics of Czechoslovak socialism.
  • Katja Naumann
    East Central Europeans positioning in international organizations in the 1920-1940s

    East Central Europeans positioning in international organizations in the 1920-1940s

    In histories of international organizations actor-centered approaches have gained prominence and shed light on the polycentric making of the international sphere. A whole range of actors from the societies of East Central Europe had their share in this. With a focus on the interwar period the paper presents positions, agendas and resources for international participation, which went far beyond the representation of the nation-states that came into existence after WW I. Hereby it focuses on the ways actors from the region transformed areas and spatialities of international cooperation and regulation.
  • Cristian Cercel
    ‘Expellees’ outside Germany: Postwar Danube Swabian Migrations to France (La Roque-sur-Pernes) and Brazil (Entre Rios/Guarapuava)

    ‘Expellees’ outside Germany: Postwar Danube Swabian Migrations to France (La Roque-sur-Pernes) and Brazil (Entre Rios/Guarapuava)

    The paper addresses two largely under-researched cases of organized Danube Swabian migration, which took place in the aftermath of WWII: the settlement of between 100 and 200 Danube Swabians in La Roque-sur-Pernes, a village in southern France, and that of about 2,500 Danube Swabians in Entre Rios, in southern Brazil. In both cases the migrants were Danube Swabians originating from Southeastern Europe (Yugoslavia, Romania, Hungary), yet living mainly in camps for displaced persons in Austria, both migration processes were connected with processes of agricultural land exploitation and were sanctioned by the respective state authorities (French and Brazilian) as “colonization” (Fr. colonisation, Br. colonisação). The paper comparatively addresses the two migrations, bringing to the fore the institutional and individual actors involved, emphasizing their interconnections, pinpointing similarities and dissimilarities, and situating them within the broader context of postwar globalization and postwar transnational entanglements.
  • Claudia Eggart
    Kyrgyzstan's bazaars – minor sites of geopolitical power struggles between Russia and China

    Kyrgyzstan's bazaars – minor sites of geopolitical power struggles between Russia and China

    Since the demise of the Soviet Union and the subsequent de-industrialization of Kyrgyzstan, the country has turned into one of the main hubs for the retailing of goods from Turkey and China to the Eurasian and Russian markets. For those engaged in small-scale, cross-border trading, it has become a fundamental necessity to constantly adapt and invent new strategies in order to live up to the changing border, trading and market regulations. My empirical research shows that the most recent challenges the traders face are closely related to the rising dependency on the crisis-ridden Russian economy, and the geopolitical power struggle between the Chinese’ "Belt and Road" initiative and the Russian-led Eurasian Economic Union.
  • Gilad Ben-Nun
    Eastern European forays into Immigration, Nationalism, and International Legal Framings

    Eastern European forays into Immigration, Nationalism, and International Legal Framings

    More extreme narratives in respect to immigration and nationalism garner the bulk of mainstream media attention in many if not most of the nations that constitute the EU. They offer the least opportunity for identifying a common ground upon which productive public discussion can work to counter the fear-mongering and demonizing that constitute the core of these narratives. The paper will work towards addressing, from the interdisciplinary standpoint of law, literature & culture, the problem of the missing middle, and to identify ways in which a different narrative can be structured that can either bridge the extremes of the political left and right, or if that is not feasible, to work towards creating a new narrative. Focussing on Eastern European forays into Immigration, Nationalism, and International Legal Framings, the paper aims at stimulating a discussion about this new narrative that creates a broad and stable middle ground, a middle-ground that highlights the core values of dignity, democracy & diversity, and the principles that support these values.
  • Lubina Mahling
    The Globalization of a region: The mission movement in the Sorbian Lusatia

    The Globalization of a region: The mission movement in the Sorbian Lusatia

    The protestant mission movement played a central role in forming the modern society of the Sorbian minority. From the 18. century to the beginning of the 20. century, more than 60 Sorbian men and women, all non cleric, served worldwide as missionaries. As agents of knowledge and cultural brokers they left traces in the mission countries as well as in Lusatia. At the same time, numerous activities like printing Sorbian mission journals; founding Sorbian mission societies; holding Sorbian mission lessons and missions festivities had a big impact on the institutionalization of Sorbian culture. The paper will focus on the Sorbian Lusatia as an area of influence of the global protestant mission movement. The aim oft he paper ist to study the local effects of this religous globalization movement for the Sorbian minority.

Abstract

Eastern Europe has been an object of academic interest for very long and innovative research has been undertaken from many perspectives to address various facets of the region’s historical and contemporary development. Evidently, Eastern Europe, whether seen as a coherent region or as an assemblage of many regions with diverging interest and orientations, has never been investigated in a completely isolated manner. On the contrary, its role in international relations, its impact of the circulation of ideas and cultural patters, its contribution to a long history of migrations as well as its position in transregional trade and division of labour have been addressed by many scholars. The debate about globalization, however, has intensified the interest in such perspectives. Based on the research aims and agenda of the Leibniz ScienceCampus "Eastern Europe - Global Area" (EEGA), this panel aims at connecting the study of Eastern Europe with the study of global processes, both historically and for the most recent times. It brings together area expertise with recent trends in the fields of global history and transregional studies. At the heart of this panel is the question as to how Eastern European societies are positioning themselves in and towards global processes and conflicts. Of particular interest here are the dynamics of global integration and the perspectives of those stakeholders championing these developments. Individual papers raise the question of the role of Eastern Europe in a globalizing world, if any, from a variety of disciplinary and temporal angles. They focus on the various scales at which border-crossing processes can be observed. Applying concepts of minority and minority positions, practices and narratives of inclusion, the studies explore processes such as migration and mobility, economic networks and political integration, as well as intercultural perspectives and identities.