D – Transregional connections and entangled regions

The politics of language

Event Details

  • Date

    Friday, 26 June - 9:00 – 11:00

  • Venue
    tba
  • Theme
    D – Transregional connections and entangled regions
Chair
  • Moncef Bakail (University of Algiers 2)
Commentator
  • Moncef Bakail (University of Algiers 2)
Panelists
  • Chignier-Riboulon Franck (Université de Clermont-Auvergne)
  • Christina Keppie (Western Washington University)
  • Ksenia Maksimovtsova (National Research University, Higher School of Economics)

Papers

  • Chignier-Riboulon Franck
    Living in French in Pubnico (Nova-Scotia, Canada), and endless fight

    Living in French in Pubnico (Nova-Scotia, Canada), and endless fight

    Pubnico is one of the still French speaking (bilingual in fact) villages of Argyle municipality. This municipality is located in the South-western part of Nova-Scotia. As other places of former Acadia, first colonists arrived by the beginning of the 17th century. As anywhere in this peninsula, they were deported in 1755, in relation between continual wars between France and England. A part of them came back to their family lands after the final defeat of France in 1763. Otherwise, deportation was an ethnic cleansing and British colonists were arrived and had got the best lands, given by British government. Therefore, they settled on rocky points, living of fishing and seafood, because soil was too poor. Over decades, they tried to preserve their culture and to get rights. But they suffered (and suffer) or minoration and minorization, maybe more than anywhere in Canada. Then assimilation process was, and stays, strong, generation after generation. I was on place in June 2019 and I did a geographical fieldwork, especially thanks to 37 interviews. Data and official reports are often different of observed concrete reality. In spite of a better provincial recognition, embrittlement is still a present situation. Nevertheless, geography is diversity and the situation of Clare, the closest bilingual community, is better, than in Pubnico. I propose a study of the village, at different geographical and historical scales, to understand social, cultural and political evolutions along decades.
  • Christina Keppie
    The Need for an Ethnolinguistic Vitality Movement in the State of Maine

    The Need for an Ethnolinguistic Vitality Movement in the State of Maine

    Without a formal territory, Acadians belong to a mainly French-speaking cultural minority that forms a global diaspora, concentrated in Eastern North America. The notion of Acadian identity as an ethnic and cultural minority has long been a topic of intense discussion among academic and elite circles. This presentation illustrates the marginalization and cultural assimilation of Maine Acadians living along the Canada-US border by Canadian Acadians, governmental legislation, and military presence at the border. Excerpts from oral testimonies collected in northern Maine in 2018 help shed light on the needs to maintain and promote the Acadian heritage through ethnolinguistic vitality projects.
  • Ksenia Maksimovtsova
    Managing Linguistic and Cultural Diversity in Post-Soviet Ukraine, Estonia, and Latvia: Nation-Building or Protection of National Minorities?

    Managing Linguistic and Cultural Diversity in Post-Soviet Ukraine, Estonia, and Latvia: Nation-Building or Protection of National Minorities?

    Estonia, Latvia, and Ukraine, which are the focus of the current study, represent one of the most controversial cases of language and cultural policies in the overall post-Soviet space. Influenced by the Soviet nationalities policy and domination of the Russian language, political elites in the three countries aimed at gradual elimination of the Soviet legacy and establishing Estonian, Latvian, and Ukrainian as the only state languages, fueling discontent among sizeable Russian minorities. It is argued that whereas the Baltic countries followed a straightforward trajectory of nation-building, post-Soviet Ukraine has undergone a nonlinear policy, with periods of partial denationalization. Based on the analysis of Internet discussions (2004-2019) in the three countries, it is argued that that, notwithstanding the differences between the Estonian and the Latvian cases on the one hand and Ukraine on the other hand, what can be observed is a convergence of the debates in Ukraine to those held in the other two countries in terms of an increasing degree of “discursive decommunization” and “derussification”.

Abstract

Abstract will follow shortly