SFB1199 https://research.uni-leipzig.de/~sfb1199 Processes of Spatialization under the Global Condition Thu, 19 Jul 2018 09:29:59 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.8.7 Entstehung und Entwicklung transnationaler Kommunikationsräume in Europa zu Kriegszeiten, 1914–1945 https://research.uni-leipzig.de/~sfb1199/publication/entstehung-und-entwicklung-transnationaler-kommunikationsraume-in-europa-zu-kriegszeiten-1914-1945/ Wed, 18 Jul 2018 12:57:25 +0000 https://research.uni-leipzig.de/~sfb1199/?post_type=publication&p=2849 Abstract The thematic issue is devoted to the influence of war on the emergence of new transnational communication spheres and experiences during the first half of the 20th century in Europe. While the interstate and civil wars during this period stand generally for a withdrawal to national or nationalistic positions, we can simultaneously observe increasing […]

The post 258 SFB_Publication_Comparativ (2018_1) appeared first on SFB1199.

]]>

Entstehung und Entwicklung transnationaler Kommunikationsräume in Europa zu Kriegszeiten, 1914–1945

Dr. Barbara Lambauer (Sorbonne U) and Prof. Dr. Christian Wenkel (U Artois)

Abstract

The thematic issue is devoted to the influence of war on the emergence of new transnational communication spheres and experiences during the first half of the 20th century in Europe. While the interstate and civil wars during this period stand generally for a withdrawal to national or nationalistic positions, we can simultaneously observe increasing intertwining and convergence of European experiences that strengthened transnational references and networks during times of existential insecurity and threat. The case studies presented here reveal the importance, for the study of such references and networks, of peripheral regions, detention camps, resistance and exile, the participation in collective cultural production and the construction of common infrastructure. In an exemplary manner, they offer evidence for the emergence of trans-European structures, convergences and public spheres during the first half of the 20th century that remained not without consequences for later developments. Thus, the thematic issue’s intention is to propose approaches for a broken Europeanisation narrative, in which divergence appears as constitutive – and not only restraining – element. In this way, it calls for a stronger consideration of transnational influences in the historiography of European wars during the 20th century.

Biographical Notes

Dr. Barbara Lambauer (Identités, relations internationales et civilisations de l’Europe, Sorbonne U, France)
Barbara Lambauer is a historian specialized on transnational history from the late 19th to the 20th century and a research partner of SIRICE (Identités, relations internationales et civilisations de l’Europe) at Sorbonne University in Paris. After studying history at the University of Graz, she gained a PhD from the Paris Institute of Political Studies. Her research deals with collaboration, policies of repression and anti-Semitic persecution in France and Europe during the Second World War. Her current project focuses on Jewish minorities and mass migrations between 1880 and 1930.

Prof. Dr. Christian Wenkel (Study Centre History and Societies, U Artois, France)
Christian Wenkel is an associate professor of history and international relations at the University of Artois. After studying history, philosophy, and modern literature at the Universities of Mainz and Dijon, he gained a PhD on the history of international relations from the Paris Institute of Political Studies and the University of Munich. His recent research projects focus on the interrelations between the European integration process and the Cold War and their consequences for Europeanization processes in the 20th century.

The post 258 SFB_Publication_Comparativ (2018_1) appeared first on SFB1199.

]]>
New Publications about Spatial Practices and Extractive Industries in Africa https://research.uni-leipzig.de/~sfb1199/2018/new-publications-about-spatial-practices-and-extractive-industries-in-africa/ Tue, 17 Jul 2018 12:01:27 +0000 https://research.uni-leipzig.de/~sfb1199/?p=2826 Recently, Prof. Dr. Ulf Engel, principal investigator of the SFB project B7 “’New regionalisms’ and Violent Conflicts in Africa: The Politics of the AU and ECOWAS in Mali and Guinea-Bissau”, co-edited two collective volumes dealing with spatial practices and extractive industries in Africa. The edited collection Spatial Practices: Territory, Border and Infrastructure in Africa presents […]

The post 258 SFB_Blog_Publications_Engel appeared first on SFB1199.

]]>

New Publications about Spatial Practices and Extractive Industries in Africa

Prof. Dr. Ulf Engel (Leipzig U)

Recently, Prof. Dr. Ulf Engel, principal investigator of the SFB project B7 “’New regionalisms’ and Violent Conflicts in Africa: The Politics of the AU and ECOWAS in Mali and Guinea-Bissau”, co-edited two collective volumes dealing with spatial practices and extractive industries in Africa.

The edited collection Spatial Practices: Territory, Border and Infrastructure in Africa presents research findings from the German Research Council’s Priority Programme 1448 “Adaptation and Change in Africa” (2011-2018). At the heart of the volume are important new spatial practices that have emerged after the end of the Cold War in the fields of conflict, climate change, migration and urban development, to name but a few, and their ordering effects with regard to social relations. These findings bear particular relevance for the co-production of territorialities and sovereignties, for borders and migrations, as well as infrastructures and orders.

Publication: Engel, Ulf, Marc Boeckler, and Detlef Müller-Mahn (eds). Spatial Practices: Territory, Border and Infrastructure in Africa (Leiden: Brill, 2018).
Source and further Information: Brill, Link (12 July 2018)

The book Extractive Industries and Changing State Dynamics in Africa uses extractive industry projects in Africa to explore how political authority and the nation-state are reconfigured at the intersection of national political contestations and global, transnational capital. Instead of focusing on technological zones and the new social assemblages at the actual sites of construction or mineral extraction, the authors use extractive industry projects as a topical lens to investigate contemporary processes of state-making at the state–corporation nexus.

Throughout the book, the authors seek to understand how public political actors and private actors of liberal capitalism negotiate and redefine notions and practices of sovereignty by setting legal, regulatory and fiscal standards. Rather than looking at resource governance from a normative perspective, the authors look at how these negotiations are shaped by and reshape the self-conception of various national and transnational actors, and how these jointly redefine the role of the state in managing these processes for the “greater good”. Extractive Industries and Changing State Dynamics in Africa will be useful for researchers, upper-level students and policy-makers who are interested in new articulations of state-making and politics in Africa.

Publication: Schubert, Joan, Ulf Engel, and Elísio Macamo (eds). Extractive Industries and Changing State Dynamics in Africa. Beyond the Resource Curse (London: Routledge, 2018).
Source and further Information: Routledge, Link (12 July 2018)

Biographical Note

Prof. Dr. Ulf Engel (Institute of African Studies & SFB 1199, Leipzig U, Germany)
Trained as a political scientist, Ulf Engel is a professor at the Institute of African Studies in Leipzig. He is the director of the DFG-funded PhD Research Training Programme (GK 1261): “Critical Junctures of Globalization” (2006–2016), the co-director of the DFG Priority Programme (SPP 1448): “Adaptation and Creativity in Africa” (2011–2017), and the director of the Integrated Research Training Group of the DFG Collaborative Research Centre (SFB 1199): “Processes of Spatialization under the Global Condition”. Engel is also a visiting professor at the Institute for Peace and Security Studies at Addis Ababa University (Ethiopia), a professor extraordinary in the Department of Political Science at Stellenbosch University, and a fellow at the Stellenbosch Institute of Advanced Studies (STIAS, South Africa).

The post 258 SFB_Blog_Publications_Engel appeared first on SFB1199.

]]>
From ‘All Under Heaven’ to ‘China in the World’ https://research.uni-leipzig.de/~sfb1199/publication/from-all-under-heaven-to-china-in-the-world/ Wed, 11 Jul 2018 13:20:56 +0000 https://research.uni-leipzig.de/~sfb1199/?post_type=publication&p=2817 About the book This proceedings book presents the first-ever cross-disciplinary analysis of 16th–20th century South, East, and Southeast Asian cartography. The central theme of the conference was the mutual influence of Western and Asian cartographic traditions, and the focus was on points of contact between Western and Asian cartographic history. Geographically, the topics were limited […]

The post 257 SFB_Publication_Pflug appeared first on SFB1199.

]]>

From ‘All Under Heaven’ to ‘China in the World’: Chinese Visual Imaginations from the Nineteenth and Early Twentieth Centuries

Laura Pflug (IfL Leipzig & Leipzig U)

About the book

This proceedings book presents the first-ever cross-disciplinary analysis of 16th–20th century South, East, and Southeast Asian cartography. The central theme of the conference was the mutual influence of Western and Asian cartographic traditions, and the focus was on points of contact between Western and Asian cartographic history. Geographically, the topics were limited to South Asia, East Asia and Southeast Asia, with special attention to India, China, Japan, Korea and Indonesia. Topics addressed included Asia’s place in the world, the Dutch East India Company, toponymy, Philipp Franz von Siebold, maritime cartography, missionary mapping and cadastral mapping.

Biographical Note

Laura Pflug (IfL Leipzig & SFB 1199, Leipzig U, Germany)
After several years of work experience in the media industry, Laura Pflug trained in Chinese studies and history and society of South Asia the Humboldt University in Berlin (Germany), as well as studied Chinese in Taiwan. Holding a master’s degree (Magistra Artium), she taught modern and classical Chinese language and held seminars on Chinese culture and history at Humboldt University in Berlin. For her current ongoing PhD project in the field of Chinese historical geography, she has conducted field work in a mountain area in the Shaanxi Province (China). Since July 2016, she is a researcher at the Leibniz Institute for Regional Geography in Leipzig in project C5: “Maps of Globalization: The Production and the Visualization of Spatial Knowledge”.

Image source and further information: Springer, Link (11 July 2018)

The post 257 SFB_Publication_Pflug appeared first on SFB1199.

]]>
Regionalismen https://research.uni-leipzig.de/~sfb1199/publication/regionalismen/ Wed, 11 Jul 2018 08:10:42 +0000 https://research.uni-leipzig.de/~sfb1199/?post_type=publication&p=2810 Abstract Regions have played a diverse part in the sovereignty strategies of specific national actors since the early 19th century. Since the end of the Cold War, they have become a preferred frame of reference in responding to current globalization processes – especially in the global South. This monograph introduces the reader to the often-fragmented […]

The post 257 SFB_Publications_Engel_Regionalismen (2018) appeared first on SFB1199.

]]>

Regionalismen

Prof. Dr. Ulf Engel (Leipzig U)

Abstract

Regions have played a diverse part in the sovereignty strategies of specific national actors since the early 19th century. Since the end of the Cold War, they have become a preferred frame of reference in responding to current globalization processes – especially in the global South. This monograph introduces the reader to the often-fragmented interdisciplinary knowledge base on topics of regionality, including associated projects.

Biographical Note

Prof. Dr. Ulf Engel (Institute of African Studies & SFB 1199, Leipzig U, Germany)
Trained as a political scientist, Ulf Engel is a professor at the Institute of African Studies in Leipzig. He is the director of the DFG-funded PhD Research Training Programme (GK 1261): “Critical Junctures of Globalization” (2006–2016), the co-director of the DFG Priority Programme (SPP 1448): “Adaptation and Creativity in Africa” (2011–2017), and the director of the Integrated Research Training Group of the DFG Collaborative Research Centre (SFB 1199): “Processes of Spatialization under the Global Condition”. Engel is also a visiting professor at the Institute for Peace and Security Studies at Addis Ababa University (Ethiopia), a professor extraordinary in the Department of Political Science at Stellenbosch University, and a fellow at the Stellenbosch Institute of Advanced Studies (STIAS, South Africa).

Image source: De Gruyter, Link (10 July 2018)

The post 257 SFB_Publications_Engel_Regionalismen (2018) appeared first on SFB1199.

]]>
Priority Programme “Volunteered Geographic Information: Interpretation, Visualisation and Social Computing” (SPP 1894) https://research.uni-leipzig.de/~sfb1199/news-item/volunteered-geographic-information-interpretation-visualisation-and-social-computing/ Mon, 02 Jul 2018 08:59:59 +0000 https://research.uni-leipzig.de/~sfb1199/?post_type=news-item&p=2806 Information In 2015, the Senate of the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG, German Research Foundation) established the Priority Programme “Volunteered Geographic Information: Interpretation, Visualisation and Social Computing” (SPP 1894). The programme is designed to run for six years. The present call invites proposals for the second three-year funding period. During the last years the availability of spatial […]

The post 256 SFB_News_CfA_Priority Programm DFG (21 November 2018) appeared first on SFB1199.

]]>

Priority Programme “Volunteered Geographic Information: Interpretation, Visualisation and Social Computing” (SPP 1894)

German Research Foundation (DFG)

Information

In 2015, the Senate of the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG, German Research Foundation) established the Priority Programme “Volunteered Geographic Information: Interpretation, Visualisation and Social Computing” (SPP 1894). The programme is designed to run for six years. The present call invites proposals for the second three-year funding period.

During the last years the availability of spatial data has rapidly developed, in particular through the diffusion of social networks, Web 2.0 platforms and availability of suitable sensor technologies. Characteristic of this development is the involvement of a large number of users, who, often using smart phones and mobile devices, generate and make freely available Volunteered Geographic Information (VGI), in the broader sense user generated spatial information.

The specific potential of this new information source is based on the characteristics of the underlying data, such as real-time availability, event-driven generation, and subjectivity, all with an implicit or explicit spatial reference. For the information society, these data can support a variety of applications for the solution of grand societal challenges e.g. in the fields of environment and disaster management, health, transport or citizen participation.

This Priority Programme aims to provide a scientific basis for raising the potential of VGI and sensor data. Three main research domains are especially relevant for the advancement of VGI, namely “Information Retrieval and Analysis of VGI”, “Geovisualisation and User Interactions Related to VGI” and “Active Participation, Social Context and Privacy Awareness”.

Proposals must be written in English and submitted to the DFG by 21 November 2018. Please note that proposals can only be submitted via elan, the DFG’s electronic proposal processing system.

Source and further information: DFG, Information for Researchers No. 32, 29 June 2018, Link (2 July 2018)

The post 256 SFB_News_CfA_Priority Programm DFG (21 November 2018) appeared first on SFB1199.

]]>
Financialising Farming as a Moral Imperative? https://research.uni-leipzig.de/~sfb1199/publication/financialising-farming-as-a-moral-imperative/ Mon, 02 Jul 2018 08:34:29 +0000 https://research.uni-leipzig.de/~sfb1199/?post_type=publication&p=2805 Abstract This paper investigates the debate about foreign investment in Australian farmland. Employing a moral perspective, it is argued that the apparent tensions over foreign land investments in recent years can be interpreted as a renegotiation of the legitimate grounds upon which farmland investments should take place. The analysis shows that elements of worth are […]

The post 256 SFB_Publication_Sippel_farming (2018) appeared first on SFB1199.

]]>

Financialising Farming as a Moral Imperative? Renegotiating the Legitimacy of Land Investments in Australia

Dr. Sarah Ruth Sippel (Leipzig U)

Abstract

This paper investigates the debate about foreign investment in Australian farmland. Employing a moral perspective, it is argued that the apparent tensions over foreign land investments in recent years can be interpreted as a renegotiation of the legitimate grounds upon which farmland investments should take place. The analysis shows that elements of worth are being applied to farmland that go beyond the ‘pure’ treatment of land according to market principles. Most notably, national references, together with concerns about control over strategic resources and the involvement of foreign sovereign entities, have gained prominence. Reacting to these concerns, the investment of domestic superannuation capital has emerged as a moral imperative to keep farmland in ‘national hands’. The paper thus stresses the need for a more nuanced differentiation between different kinds of ‘capital’ and particularly the way they are morally evaluated. The paper furthermore reveals that the linkages between capital and ‘nature’ are not forged in a random or arbitrary way. They are crucially shaped by the societal understanding of the legitimacy of certain kinds of capital and their associated motives and intentions as part of the broader understanding about the rules and principles that should govern economic activities.

Biographical Note

Dr. Sarah Ruth Sippel (Institute of Anthropology & SFB 1199, Leipzig U, Germany)
Sarah Ruth Sippel studied Middle Eastern studies and philosophy (Leipzig, Germany and Aix-en-Provence, France) and received her PhD in geography (Leipzig). In her PhD dissertation she combined a global agri-food systems perspective with various approaches to human and livelihood security in order to investigate processes of social differentiation in Moroccan export agriculture. Her current research project addresses the diverse imaginations of land through the lens of Australia’s increasing agricultural ties to the Gulf States and China.

The post 256 SFB_Publication_Sippel_farming (2018) appeared first on SFB1199.

]]>
Women’s Global Mobility and Travel Writing in Bombay’s Tyabji Clan https://research.uni-leipzig.de/~sfb1199/event/womens-global-mobility-and-travel-writing-in-bombays-tyabji-clan/ Thu, 14 Jun 2018 11:55:20 +0000 https://research.uni-leipzig.de/~sfb1199/?post_type=event&p=2789 Abstract The Global and European Studies Institute (Leipzig U) invites to an open lecture titled “What cannot be cured must be endured: Women’s global mobility and travel writing in Bombay’s Tyabji clan, c. 1894–1947.” This lecture is part of a more extensive project titled “Veiled Voyagers: Muslim Women – Travellers from Asia and the Middle […]

The post 253 SFB_Event_Lecture_Lambert (18 June 2018) appeared first on SFB1199.

]]>

‘What Cannot be Cured Must be Endured’: Women’s Global Mobility and Travel Writing in Bombay’s Tyabji Clan, c. 1894–1947

Dr. Siobhan Lambert-Hurley (U Sheffield)

Abstract

The Global and European Studies Institute (Leipzig U) invites to an open lecture titled “What cannot be cured must be endured: Women’s global mobility and travel writing in Bombay’s Tyabji clan, c. 1894–1947.” This lecture is part of a more extensive project titled “Veiled Voyagers: Muslim Women – Travellers from Asia and the Middle East” . Key speaker will be Dr. Siobhan Lambert-Hurley from the University of Sheffield.

Biographical Note

Dr Siobhan Lambert-Hurley (Department of History, U Sheffield, UK)
Siobhan Lambert-Hurley completed her BA in Asian Studies at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver before moving to the School of Oriental and African Studies at the University of London to study for her PhD in History. She joined the History Department at the University of Sheffield in 2015 from the Department of Politics, History and International Relations at Loughborough University. Her research on women, gender and Islam in South Asia has been funded by the Leverhulme Trust, the AHRC, the British Academy, HEFCE, and the Social Studies and Humanities Research Council of Canada, and she was visiting faculty at the University of British Columbia in 2013–14 and 2017. She led an international research network funded by the AHRC on ‘Women’s Autobiography in Islamic Societies‘ and a teaching project funded by the Higher Education Academy on ‘Accessing Muslim Lives: Translating and Digitising Autobiographical Writings for Teaching and Learning‘. Her current project funded by the Leverhulme Trust is ‘Veiled Voyagers: Muslim Women Travellers from Asia and the Middle East’ (2015–18).

Image source: U Sheffield, Link (14 June 2018)

The post 253 SFB_Event_Lecture_Lambert (18 June 2018) appeared first on SFB1199.

]]>
Beyond the Kremlin’s Reach? Eastern Europe and China in the Cold War Era https://research.uni-leipzig.de/~sfb1199/publication/beyond-the-kremlins-reach-eastern-europe-and-china-in-the-cold-war-era/ Thu, 07 Jun 2018 07:57:57 +0000 https://research.uni-leipzig.de/~sfb1199/?post_type=publication&p=2781 Abstract This special issue examines relations between the People’s Republic of China and socialist Eastern European states during the Cold War. By focusing on transfers and interconnections, and on the social dimension of governmental interactions, our main goal is to explore structures, institutions and spaces of interaction between China and Eastern Europe and their potential […]

The post 253 SFB_Publication_Journal_Zofka appeared first on SFB1199.

]]>

Beyond the Kremlin’s Reach? Eastern Europe and China in the Cold War Era

Dr. Jan Zofka (Leipzig U), Dr. Péter Vámos (U Budapest), and Dr. Sören Urbansky (GHI Waschington DC)

Abstract

This special issue examines relations between the People’s Republic of China and socialist Eastern European states during the Cold War. By focusing on transfers and interconnections, and on the social dimension of governmental interactions, our main goal is to explore structures, institutions and spaces of interaction between China and Eastern Europe and their potential autonomy from political conjunctures. The guiding question we raise is: To what degree did Chinese and Eastern European players beyond the centres of power have room to manoeuvre outside the agendas of the Kremlin, national governments or party leadership?

Biographical Notes

Dr. Jan Zofka (SFB 1199, Leipzig U, Germany)
Jan Zofka is a historian specializing in the history of twentieth-century state socialism. He received a PhD from Leipzig University for a dissertation about late- and post-Soviet separatist movements in Crimea and Transnistria (Moldova). Since 2014, he has been researching transnational dimensions of socialist industrialization during the Cold War with a special interest in its connectedness to global developments. After having concentrated on industrial projects and exchange of COMECON states in and with the People’s Republic of China, he will now focus on the infrastructures of trade and agricultural cooperation between Bulgaria and African countries during the global economic expansion from World War II until the 1970s.

Dr. Péter Vámos (Hungarian Academy of Sciences & Károli Gáspár University, Budapest, Hungary)
Péter Vámos is a researcher at the institute of history at the Hungarian Academy of Sciences and associate professor at the institute for East Asian languages and cultures at Károli Gáspár University in Budapest. He holds a CSc (PhD) from the Hungarian Academy of Sciences and completed his habilitation in history at Eörvös Loránd University (ELTE) in Budapest in 2007. Vámos has published widely on modern Chinese history and international relations, Sino-Soviet relations, Sino-Hungarian relations, and the history of Christianity in China.

Dr. Sören Urbansky (German Historical Institute, Washington DC, USA)
Sören Urbansky is a historian of Russia and China in the modern era, specializing in imperial and racial entanglements, emigration and the history of borders. Before he joined the GHI in 2018, he has taught Chinese and Russian history at the Universities of Munich and Freiburg and was a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Cambridge. He is the author of Kolonialer Wettstreit: Russland, China, Japan und die Ostchinesische Eisenbahn (Frankfurt: Campus, 2008) and Beyond the Steppe Hill: The Making of the Sino-Russian Border (Princeton: Princeton University Press, forthcoming in 2019). He is currently embarking on a new project that examines anti-Chinese sentiments in a global perspective.

The post 253 SFB_Publication_Journal_Zofka appeared first on SFB1199.

]]>
Soviet African Studies Between Enthusiasm and Discomfort https://research.uni-leipzig.de/~sfb1199/publication/soviet-african-studies-between-enthusiasm-and-discomfort/ Wed, 06 Jun 2018 11:59:36 +0000 https://research.uni-leipzig.de/~sfb1199/?post_type=publication&p=2779 Abstract Focusing on the mid-1950s to the mid-1970s, the article looks at Africa through the eyes of Soviet scholars, who sought to comprehend the dramatic transformations on the continent. Incipient efforts under Comintern auspices in the 1920s and 1930s had fallen prey to the Stalinist purges. Since the mid-1950s, Soviet African Studies started to flourish, […]

The post 253 SFB_Publication_Article_Steffi appeared first on SFB1199.

]]>

The Provocation of Empirical Evidence: Soviet African Studies Between Enthusiasm and Discomfort

Dr. Steffi Marung (Leipzig U)

Abstract

Focusing on the mid-1950s to the mid-1970s, the article looks at Africa through the eyes of Soviet scholars, who sought to comprehend the dramatic transformations on the continent. Incipient efforts under Comintern auspices in the 1920s and 1930s had fallen prey to the Stalinist purges. Since the mid-1950s, Soviet African Studies started to flourish, when socialism became a global project on Soviet political agendas in the context of cold war competition. Their expansion, however, was just as much an effect of intensifying encounters with colleagues in the region. Soviet scholars did not only struggle to reconcile the Marxist–Leninist framework with the diverse dynamics in African societies. They were also provoked by the reactions they received from Western and African counterparts during travels, and conferences. Challenging a diffusionist understanding of how ideas about socialism were ‘transferred’ from the Soviet Union to Africa, the key argument here is that the Soviet Union was neither an unchallenged ‘exporter’ of such models, nor where these static. Empirical evidence from Russian archives rather reveals confusion, destabilization and perceived marginalization of the Soviet position. Africa was, in this regard, not a repository for Soviet ideas about socialist transformation, but a space providing unforeseen challenges for Soviet theorizations through encounters and conversations.

Biographical Note

Dr. Steffi Marung (SFB 1199, Leipzig U, Germany)
Steffi Marung earned a PhD in global studies from Leipzig University with a study on shifting border regimes of the expanding European Union since 1990. Prior to earning her PhD, she had studied political science and German literature in Halle, Berlin, and Prague. From there, she further developed her interest in processes of (re-)spatialization into an ongoing book project on the transnational history of Soviet African studies during the Cold War. In the framework of the international collaborative project “Socialism Goes Global”, she has extended this research towards more general questions of the geographies of East-South encounters during the Cold War. Teaching global history courses at the Global and European Studies Institute at Leipzig University and being involved in further book projects (one on the transnational history of East Central Europe since the nineteenth century, another one on the global history of area studies, and a third one on transregional studies), she contributes to the SFB’s programme with research on the historiographical background of and multiple disciplinary theoretical foundations for the investigation of spatial formats and spatial orders. To this end, she endeavours to facilitate and promote joint cross-project discussions and the formation of a common theoretical language and framework.

The post 253 SFB_Publication_Article_Steffi appeared first on SFB1199.

]]>
The Role of Actors for Processes of Spatialization https://research.uni-leipzig.de/~sfb1199/news-item/the-role-of-actors-for-processes-of-spatialization-cfr/ Wed, 06 Jun 2018 11:43:59 +0000 https://research.uni-leipzig.de/~sfb1199/?post_type=news-item&p=2778 Information The workshop addresses the intersection of two dialectical processes. First, we trace the way people’s practices and imaginations shape spaces. Second, we consider the relationship between individuals and collectives. During the workshop, we will discuss how these dynamics of making space and making collectives are interlinked. In order to realize this agenda, we critically […]

The post 253 SFB_News_CfR_Workshop_Actors (13-14 Jul. 2018) appeared first on SFB1199.

]]>

The Role of Actors for Processes of Spatialization

Prof. Dr. Ursula Rao, Dr. Arne Harms, Katharina Döring, and Jens Herpolsheimer (Leipzig U)

Information

The workshop addresses the intersection of two dialectical processes. First, we trace the way people’s practices and imaginations shape spaces. Second, we consider the relationship between individuals and collectives. During the workshop, we will discuss how these dynamics of making space and making collectives are interlinked. In order to realize this agenda, we critically engage the following assumptions:

  1. Actors shape social spaces and, while doing so, promote or undermine specific spatial formats (Raumformate). At the same time, the particularities of existing spaces impact actors’ practices, orientations, choices, and ideas. As sediments of past practices, durable spatial orderings affect the way actors experience, think about, and shape space. They restrain social action or provoke the desire for change.
  2. These actions of space-making are generally the outcome of collective action, achieved by people acting in unison as members of specific groups, thereby contributing not just to processes of spatialization, but also to the re-making of bodies that function as ‘collective actors’. This involves an irreducible tension: collectives frame the ways individuals “do” space, while persons might transform and shift collective frameworks impacting processes of spatialization.

Thinking of the practice of “doing” space along these two trajectories will help us to better understand the role actors play in making, changing, and applying spatial formats (Raumformate).

We will start each day with a 45-minute lecture presented by the two keynote speakers, respectively, and subsequent Q&A. We will then spend the remainder of the day discussing research papers written by workshop participants. Discussion papers will be circulated beforehand. In addition, one session will be devoted to the exploration of texts that are key for our understanding of processes of spatialization.

Colleagues interested in joining the workshop are asked to inform the organizers via sfb1199@uni-leipzig.de.

The post 253 SFB_News_CfR_Workshop_Actors (13-14 Jul. 2018) appeared first on SFB1199.

]]>